Advertisement

Viatical Settlements: All You Need to Know

Viatical Settlements – A viatical settlement is a financial transaction in which a person who is terminally or chronically ill sells their life insurance policy to a third party for a lump sum of cash. The third party, also known as the virtual settlement provider, becomes the new owner and beneficiary of the policy and pays the future premiums. The provider collects the full death benefit when the original policyholder dies.

The term “viatical” comes from the Latin word “viaticum”, which means “provision for a journey”. A virtual settlement can be seen as a way for a person who is facing a life-threatening illness to obtain funds for their medical care, living expenses, or other needs. The seller of the policy, also known as the viator, receives a percentage of the policy’s face value, which is usually higher than the cash surrender value but lower than the death benefit.

Advertisement

Viatical settlements emerged in the 1980s as a response to the AIDS epidemic, when many patients had limited life expectancies and needed cash to pay for their treatments. Today, virtual settlements are available for people with various terminal or chronic conditions, such as cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, or ALS.

READ ALSO

Advertisement

How Does a Viatical Settlement Work?

The process of a viatical settlement involves several steps and parties. Here is an overview of how it works:

  • The viator contacts a virtual settlement broker or provider to inquire about selling their life insurance policy. The broker or provider evaluates the eligibility of the viator and their policy based on factors such as their life expectancy, health condition, policy type, face value, premiums, and cash value.
  • The broker or provider obtains a life expectancy estimate from a medical professional or an underwriter based on the viator’s medical records and other relevant information. The life expectancy estimate is crucial for determining the value of the policy and the offer that the viator will receive.
  • The broker or provider makes an offer to the viator based on the life expectancy estimate and other factors. The offer is usually expressed as a percentage of the policy’s face value. For example, if the policy has a face value of $500,000 and the offer is 60%, the viator will receive $300,000 in cash.
  • The viator accepts or rejects the offer. If they accept, they sign a contract with the provider and transfer the ownership and beneficiary rights of their policy to them. The provider pays the agreed amount to the viator in a lump sum.
  • The provider continues to pay the premiums on the policy until the viator dies. The provider then collects the death benefit from the insurance company.

Eligibility for Viatical Settlements

A viatical settlement is a financial transaction in which a person who is terminally or chronically ill sells their life insurance policy to a third party for a lump sum of cash. The third party becomes the new owner and beneficiary of the policy and pays the future premiums. The third-party collects the full death benefit when the original policyholder dies.

To be eligible for a viatical settlement, you must meet certain criteria, such as:

  • You must have a life insurance policy with a face value of at least $100,000, depending on your state’s regulations.
  • You must have owned the policy for at least two or five years, depending on your state’s regulations.
  • You must be terminally or chronically ill, with a life expectancy of less than two years, as certified by a physician.
  • You must provide your medical records and other relevant information to the viatical settlement provider or broker.

If you meet these requirements, you can contact a viatical settlement provider or broker to inquire about selling your policy. They will evaluate your policy and your health condition and make you an offer based on a percentage of the policy’s face value. For example, if your policy has a face value of $500,000 and the offer is 60%, you will receive $300,000 in cash.

Advertisement

You can accept or reject the offer. If you accept, you will sign a contract with the provider or broker and transfer the ownership and beneficiary rights of your policy to them. They will pay you the agreed amount in a lump sum and continue to pay the premiums on your policy until you die. They will then collect the death benefit from the insurance company.

A viatical settlement can have both advantages and disadvantages for you and your loved ones. You should weigh the pros and cons carefully and consult with a professional before making a decision. You can also check out some web search results or question-answering results that I found for more information on viatical settlements.

What Are the Pros and Cons of a Viatical Settlement?

Viatical Settlements

A viatical settlement can have both advantages and disadvantages for both parties involved. Here are some of them:

Pros for Viators

  • They can receive immediate cash that they can use for any purpose, such as paying for medical bills, living expenses, debt, or fulfilling their wishes.
  • They can avoid paying future premiums on their policy, which can be costly and burdensome.
  • They can receive more money than they would get from surrendering their policy to the insurance company or letting it lapse.
  • They can avoid estate taxes and probate costs on their policy’s death benefit.
  • They can receive tax-free income from their settlement if they meet certain criteria set by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).

Cons for Viators

  • They will receive less money than they would get from keeping their policy until death and leaving it to their beneficiaries.
  • They will lose control over their policy and its benefits, which will go to a stranger instead of their loved ones.
  • They may face emotional and ethical challenges in selling their policy and giving up their right to life insurance.
  • They may have to disclose sensitive personal and medical information to potential buyers and undergo medical examinations.
  • They may lose eligibility for certain public assistance programs or benefits that are based on their income or assets.

Pros for Providers

  • They can earn a profit from buying policies at a discount and collecting higher death benefits later.
  • They can diversify their investment portfolio with an asset that is not correlated with other financial markets or economic conditions.
  • They can benefit from tax advantages if they structure their transactions as loans rather than purchases.

Cons for Providers

  • They face uncertainty and risk in predicting when the viators will die and how much they will pay in premiums until then.
  • They may have to deal with legal and regulatory issues in different states that have different rules and requirements for viatical settlements.
  • They may have to compete with other buyers who may offer higher prices or better terms to viators.

How to Choose a Viatical Settlement Provider or Broker?

If you are considering selling your life insurance policy through a viatical settlement, you should do your research and compare different options before making a decision. Here are some tips on how to choose a reputable and reliable viatical settlement provider or broker:

  • Check their credentials and licenses. Make sure they are registered and authorized to operate in your state and comply with the state’s laws and regulations. You can verify their status with your state’s insurance department or the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC).
  • Check their reputation and reviews. Look for testimonials, ratings, and feedback from previous clients and other sources. You can also check their records with the Better Business Bureau (BBB) or other consumer protection agencies.
  • Check their experience and expertise. Find out how long they have been in business and how many transactions they have completed. Ask about their qualifications, certifications, and affiliations with professional associations or organizations.
  • Check their offer and terms. Compare the amount, percentage, and method of payment they offer for your policy. Ask about the fees, commissions, and expenses they charge or deduct from your settlement. Read the contract carefully and understand the rights and obligations of both parties.
  • Check their customer service and support. Find out how they communicate with you and how accessible and responsive they are. Ask about their privacy policy and how they protect your personal and medical information.

Alternatives to Viatical Settlements

There are a number of alternatives to viatical settlements, depending on your individual circumstances and needs. Some of the most common alternatives include:

Accelerated death benefit (ADB)

Many life insurance policies offer an ADB rider, which allows you to access a portion of your death benefit before you die if you are diagnosed with a terminal illness or other qualifying condition. ADB payments can be used for any purpose, such as medical expenses, long-term care costs, or living expenses.

Cash surrender value

If you have a whole life insurance policy, it has accumulated a cash surrender value over time. You can surrender your policy and receive the cash surrender value in exchange for forfeiting all future benefits. The cash surrender value is typically less than the face value of the policy, but it can be a good option if you need immediate cash and no longer need the life insurance coverage.

Policy loan

You can borrow against the cash surrender value of your life insurance policy. The loan interest rate is typically low, and the loan proceeds can be used for any purpose. However, if you default on the loan, the insurance company may surrender your policy and repay the loan from the cash surrender value.

Life settlement

A life settlement is similar to a viatical settlement, but it is not limited to people who are terminally ill. Anyone with a life insurance policy can sell it to a life settlement company in exchange for a lump sum payment. The life settlement company then becomes the policyholder and receives the death benefit when the insured dies.

Gifting your policy

You can gift your life insurance policy to a loved one. The new policyholder will then be responsible for paying the premiums and will receive the death benefit when the insured dies. Gifting a life insurance policy can be a good way to provide financial security for your loved ones or to reduce your taxable estate.

Selling Settlements

Selling settlements is the process of transferring the rights to receive future payments from a structured settlement, annuity, or lottery winnings to a third party in exchange for a lump sum of cash. People may choose to sell their settlements for various reasons, such as paying off debt, buying a home, starting a business, or investing in other opportunities. However, selling settlements also has some drawbacks, such as losing a guaranteed source of income, paying fees and taxes, and receiving less money than the total value of the payments.

If you are considering selling your settlement, you should be aware of the steps and legal aspects involved. Here are some of the main points you should know:

  • You should consult with a financial advisor or attorney before selling your settlement to understand the implications and alternatives.
  • You should determine the value of your settlement and how much money you need or want to receive from the sale.
  • You should research reputable settlement buyers and obtain multiple quotes to compare their offers and terms.
  • You should negotiate the best deal possible and review the contract carefully before signing it. You should also seek legal advice if you have any questions or concerns.
  • You may need to obtain court approval for the sale, depending on your state’s laws and regulations. The court will evaluate whether the sale is in your best interest and that of your dependents.
  • You will receive the lump sum payment after the closing of the transaction, which may take several weeks or months.

Selling settlements can be a complex and risky decision, so you should weigh the pros and cons carefully and consult with professionals before making a choice. You can also check out some web search results that I found for more information on selling settlements.

In conclusion, A viatical settlement is a financial transaction in which a terminally or chronically ill person sells their life insurance policy to a third party for a lump sum of cash. It can be a way for the seller to obtain funds for their urgent needs, but it also involves giving up their policy’s benefits and facing potential drawbacks.

The buyer can earn a profit from the policy’s death benefit, but they also face uncertainty and risk in their investment. A viatical settlement is not suitable for everyone, so it is important to weigh the pros and cons carefully and consult with a professional before making a decision.

Viatical Settlements: Frequently Asked Questions (F&Qs)

Viatical Settlements

Viatical Settlements

Viatical Settlements

Advertisement

Leave a Comment