What Is a Blanket Bond?: A Comprehensive Guide

Advertisement

Blanket Bond – A blanket bond is a type of insurance policy that protects businesses and organizations from losses caused by employee dishonesty, fraud, theft, forgery, or other acts of trust violation. A blanket bond may also cover property damage or lawsuits resulting from such acts. A blanket bond can cover several persons, projects, or properties that require performance bonds.

READ ALSO

What Is a Blanket Bond?

A blanket bond is an insurance policy sold by insurance companies that protects a firm from illegal or unethical behavior carried out by its employees. Despite its name, it is not a “bond” in the sense of debt security and is not traded. Rather, it is an insurance policy sold by insurance companies.

A blanket bond is also known as a blanket fidelity bond or blanket honesty bond. In some ways, this type of insurance is similar to umbrella insurance policies held by individuals, which protect against unforeseen liabilities that may be incurred in the case of a lawsuit.

Advertisement

A blanket bond is called “blanket” since it covers all sorts of hazards, including, but not limited to, trading fraud, embezzlement, material, intellectual theft, and forgery carried out by company employees or contractors. A blanket bond is unique with respect to most other insurance types because it protects against losses incurred as a direct result of activities from within the company.

Why Do Businesses Need a Blanket Bond?

A blanket bond is especially useful for businesses and organizations that deal with money, securities, or valuable assets on a regular basis. Examples of such businesses are brokerages, investment bankers, financial institutions, accounting firms, law firms, and government agencies.

A blanket bond provides a safeguard against losses that may arise from employee dishonesty or fraud that may not be detected by internal controls or audits. A blanket bond also helps to maintain the reputation and credibility of the business in the eyes of customers, investors, regulators, and the public.

This bond may be required by law or regulation for certain types of businesses or organizations. For example, in the United States, banker’s blanket bond (BBB) coverage is typically required by the firm’s state regulatory authority as well as by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) for investment firms and other financial companies.

What Does a Blanket Bond Cover?

This bond covers a wide range of losses that may result from employee dishonesty or fraud. Some of the common types of losses covered by a blanket bond are:

  • Forgery: The act of falsifying signatures, documents, checks, or other instruments for personal gain or to deceive others.
  • Counterfeit: The act of producing or using fake money, securities, or other items that resemble genuine ones.
  • Fraudulent trading: The act of engaging in unauthorized or illegal transactions involving securities or commodities for personal gain or to manipulate prices.
  • Embezzlement: The act of stealing or misappropriating money or property entrusted to one’s care or custody.
  • Theft: The act of taking money or property belonging to another without permission or consent.
  • Property damage: The act of causing physical harm or destruction to property owned by another.
  • Lawsuits: The act of being sued or held liable for damages resulting from employee dishonesty or fraud.

A blanket bond may also cover losses from fraudulent activities carried out by non-employees who have access to the business’s premises, systems, or information. For example, a hacker who breaches the security of a bank’s network and steals customer data may trigger a claim under the blanket bond.

A blanket bond does not cover every possible loss that may occur due to employee dishonesty or fraud. Some of the common exclusions are:

  • Losses due to errors or omissions: The act of making mistakes or failing to perform duties that result in losses for the business or its customers.
  • Losses due to negligence or incompetence: The act of failing to exercise reasonable care or skill that results in losses for the business or its customers.
  • Losses due to collusion: The act of conspiring with others to commit dishonesty or fraud against the business or its customers.
  • Losses due to war or terrorism: The act of engaging in violent acts that cause losses for the business or its customers due to political or ideological motives.
  • Losses due to natural disasters: The act of being affected by events such as fire, flood, earthquake, storm, etc. that cause losses for the business or its customers.

How Much Does a Blanket Bond Cost?

The type and size of the business

The nature and scope of the business’s operations, the number and value of the assets involved, the number and turnover of the employees, and the industry and regulatory standards may affect the risk and exposure of the business to employee dishonesty or fraud.

The amount and extent of coverage

The limit and deductible of the blanket bond, the types and exclusions of losses covered, and the duration and renewal terms of the policy may affect the premium and claims of the bond.

The loss history and prevention measures

The frequency and severity of past losses due to employee dishonesty or fraud, the quality and effectiveness of the internal controls and audits, and the training and screening of the employees may affect the likelihood and impact of future losses.

How to File a Claim Under a Blanket Bond?

If a business suffers a loss due to employee dishonesty or fraud that is covered by a blanket bond, it should follow these steps to file a claim:

Notify the insurance company

The business should contact the insurance company as soon as possible after discovering the loss and provide details such as the date, time, location, amount, cause, and parties involved in the loss. The business should also cooperate with the insurance company’s investigation and provide any evidence or documentation that may support the claim.

Notify the authorities

The business should report the loss to the relevant authorities, such as the police, regulators, or courts if required by law or regulation. The business should also comply with any legal or regulatory obligations that may arise from the loss.

Mitigate the loss

The business should take reasonable steps to prevent further losses or damages from occurring due to employee dishonesty or fraud. For example, the business should terminate or suspend the employee involved in the loss, recover or secure any stolen or damaged property, notify or compensate any affected customers or third parties, etc.

Receive payment

The insurance company will review and verify the claim and determine whether it is valid and covered by the blanket bond. If so, the insurance company will pay the claim up to the limit of the policy, minus any deductible or co-insurance. If not, the insurance company will deny or reject the claim and provide reasons for doing so.

What Are Some Types of Blanket Bonds?

Business service bond

A type of blanket bond that protects businesses that provide services to other businesses or individuals from losses due to employee dishonesty or fraud. For example, a cleaning company may purchase a business service bond to cover losses from theft or damage caused by its employees while working at a client’s premises.

Janitorial bond

A type of blanket bond that protects janitorial or cleaning businesses from losses due to employee dishonesty or fraud. For example, a janitorial company may purchase a janitorial bond to cover losses from theft or damage caused by its employees while working at a client’s premises.

Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) bond

A type of blanket bond that protects employee benefit plans from losses due to employee dishonesty or fraud. For example, an employer who sponsors a 401(k) plan for its employees may purchase an ERISA bond to cover losses from theft or misuse of plan assets by its employees or plan administrators.

In conclusion, A blanket bond is a type of insurance policy that protects businesses and organizations from losses caused by employee dishonesty, fraud, theft, forgery, or other acts of trust violation. This bond may also cover property damage or lawsuits resulting from such acts. It can cover several persons, projects, or properties that require performance bonds.

Frequently Asked Questions (F&Qs)

What is a banker’s blanket bond?

A banker’s blanket bond (BBB) is an insurance policy that covers a bank for risks related to fraud and dishonesty. It is also sometimes called a blanket fidelity bond. The policy typically covers losses that result from employee dishonesty, such as theft, forgery, and embezzlement. It may also cover losses that result from fraud committed by non-employees, such as check fraud and bank robbery.

What is a blanket in banking?

The term “blanket” in banking can refer to two different things:

  • A banker’s blanket bond is an insurance policy that protects a bank for risks related to fraud and dishonesty. It is also sometimes called a blanket fidelity bond.
  • A blanket guarantee is a government guarantee that covers all or part of the liabilities of a financial institution. This type of guarantee is typically used during a banking crisis to prevent bank runs.

What is an honesty bond?

An honesty bond, also known as a fidelity bond, employee dishonesty bond, or business service bond, is a type of insurance policy that protects a business from losses that result from employee dishonesty. The policy typically covers losses that result from theft, forgery, and embezzlement. It may also cover losses that result from fraud committed by non-employees, such as check fraud and bank robbery.

What is a bond in a financial institution?

In the context of financial institutions, a bond is a type of insurance policy that protects the institution from losses that result from employee dishonesty, burglary, robbery, forgery, and similar crime exposures. It is also known as a financial institution bond (FIB).

Advertisement